TROMSO TO HALIFAX

 


28 DAYS

Lined with picturesque fishing villages, and sweeping sea vistas framed by a rocky coastline, the route of the Norse is exceptional. Experience 19 different ports in 4 unique countries as you sail through Norway, Greenland, Iceland & Canada.

ITINERARY SUMMARY
DayPlaceHighlights
Day 1Tromso, NorwayEnjoy this fantastic Norwegian town before boarding the Silver Explorer in the evening
Day 2At SeaTowards Svalbard
Day 3Cruise & Explore Bear Island, SvalbardExperience nature in its finest in this southernmost island of the Svalbard Archipelago
Day 4Svalbard Southern RegionGlaciers, historical buildings
Days 5 - 7Svalbard Northern RegionBeautiful fjords, prominent glaciers, hike stunning scenery
Days 8 & 9At SeaTowards Greenland
Days 10 - 12Scoresby SundExplore this untimate fjord system
Day 13IttoqqortoormiitBird cliffs, kittiwakes, guillemots, auklets and fulmars
Day 14At SeaTowards Iceland
Day 15Reykjavik, IcelandWelcome new travellers on board as you set sail again in the afternoon
Day 16At SeaTowards Greenland
Day 17Skjoldungen, GreenlandEnchanting fjord with beautiful scenery
Day 18Prince Christian Sound & Aappilattoq (Kujalleq), Cruise this famous sound and explore a small and remote settlement
Day 19Nanortalik (Kujallek), Uunartoq Island, GreenlandVisit Nanortalik, Greenland’s tenth-largest and most southernly town and Uunartoq Island, which was once considered the largest settlement in Greenland
Day 20Qaqortoq (Julianehaab) & Hvalsey, GreenlandFirst visit the largest town in southern Greenland followed by Hvalsey, featuring scattered ruins from the Norse period
Days 21 & 22At SeaTowards Canada
Day 23St Anthony (Newfoundland), CanadaDiscover this historical fishing town with beautiful hikes
Day 24Woody Point (Newfoundland), CanadaExplore the Mars like Gros Morne National Park
Day 25At SeaTowards Nova Scotia
Day 26Baddeck, CanadaThe most highly developed town tourist centre in Cape Breton
Day 27Louisbourg (Nova Scotia), CanadaThriving sea port on the eastern tip of Cape Breton Island
Day 28Halifax (Nova Scotia), CanadaDisembark from the Silver Explorer
ATC_SilverExplorer-Tromso-to-Halifax

Ship Offering This Itinerary

Silver Explorer

The Silver Explorer was built in Finland in 1989 and was designed specifically for navigating waters in some of the world’s most remote destinations including Iceland, Greenland and Spitsbergen (Svalbard). The vessel was acquired by Silversea in late 2007 when it was fully refurbished and relaunched in 2008 as an elegant luxury expedition cruise ship. Its ice-strengthened hull enables the ship to safely push through ice floes with ease, while a fleet of Zodiac boats allows guests to visit even the most incredible locations accompanied by the expert Expedition Team.

Accommodation aboard comprises 66 spacious suites located across 4 decks, all with ocean views and some with private balconies. Passengers will also find an excellent range of facilities aboard including two lounges, restaurant, presentation theatre, library/Internet, spa, fitness centre, two jacuzzis, and outdoor viewing areas.

 

Day 1 Tromso, Norway

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Overview:

Tromsø surprised visitors in the 1800s: they thought it was very sophisticated and cultured for being so close to the North Pole—hence its nickname, the ‘Paris of the North’. It looks the way a polar town should—with ice-capped mountain ridges and jagged architecture that is an echo of the peaks. The midnight sun shines from May 21 to July 21, and it is said that the northern lights decorate the night skies over Tromsø more than over any other city in Norway. Tromsø is home to only 69,000 people, but it’s very spread out—the city’s total area, 2,558 square km, is the most expansive in Norway. The downtown area is on a small, hilly island connected to the mainland by a slender bridge. The 13,000 students at the world’s northernmost university are one reason the nightlife here is uncommonly busy. Board the Silver Explorer in the late evening.

Day 2 At Sea

red-legged-kittiwake-shutterstock_718150405-small

Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is whale watching from the Observatory Lounge, writing home to your loved ones or simply relaxing, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.

Day 3 Bear Island, Svalbard

Puffin Arctic

Almost half way between Tromsø and Svalbard is isolated Bear Island – considered the southernmost island of the Svalbard Archipelago. The unglaciated island is an impressive Nature Reserve of steep, high cliffs that are frequented by seabirds, specifically at the southern tip. Brünnich’s Guillemots, Common Guillemots, Black Guillemots, Razorbills, Little Auks, Northern Fulmars, Glaucous Gulls, Black-legged Kittiwakes, and even Atlantic Puffins and Northern Gannets nest along the cliffs south of Sørhamna. Because of the large numbers of birds and the isolated location, Bear Island has been recognized as an Important Bird Area. It was once a hotspot for whaling and walrus hunting, and at one stage even mining.

Bear Island received its name because of a polar bear encountered by early explorer Willem Barentsz. Today polar bears rarely visit the island and its only settlement is a meteorological station manned all-year round on the north side.

Day 4 Svalbard Southern Region

Icewall Svalbard

Svalbard’s Southern Region and specifically Spitsbergen’s west coast is less ice-clogged than the rest of Svalbard due to the moderating influenced of the Gulf Stream. Several fjords cut into the western coast of Spitsbergen and have been used by trappers and hunters, as well as the different mining companies that tried to exploit the riches of the archipelago’s largest island of Spitsbergen. Remains of huts and mines, as well as active commercial and scientific settlements can be found and visited. Depending on the time of the season, glaciers can be visited on foot or by sea. Northern places like Magdalenefjorden and Hornsund will reveal fascinating views of geological formations, craggy mountains, spectacular glaciers and a variety of seabirds and seals.

Days 5-7 Svalbard Northern Region

Reindeer Svalbard Spitsbergen

There are several deep fjords and prominent glaciers in the northern reaches of Svalbard, as well as the northern hemisphere’s widest glacier front. Ice conditions will dictate how much can be accessed in terms of cruising bird islets like the Andøyane Islets or approaching glaciers like Monaco Glacier and Seliger Glacier. The Northern Region is also known to have several walrus haul-outs and areas defined as “Arctic Desert”. Walks and hikes ashore to have a closer look at flora and wildlife are a possibility in the spectacular Northern Region of Svalbard.

Days 8-9 At Sea

At Sea Dolphin

Relax on board and keep an eye out for sea birds and other wildlife as you make your way towards the beautiful Scoresby Sund

Days 10-12 Scoresby Sund

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Scoresbysund is the ultimate fjord system; likely the longest, largest and deepest of any in the world. The massive fjord is tucked into the eastern coast of Greenland and on the icy western edges of the Greenland Sea. Scoresbysund’s scale deserves several days to explore, especially while plying the waters between castle-sized icebergs as they gently drift under the persuasion of the Arctic waters in the mighty fjord. Scattered in the remote bays and smaller fjords are places to discover old Inuit settlements, slowly growing over with Arctic willow and dwarf birch. The lower slopes of many mountains are draped in the herbs and grasses favoured by muskox, Arctic fox, lemmings, Ptarmigan, Barnacle Geese, and Snowy Owls. Tundra walks give impressive views of landscape, flora and fauna. Not to be neglected, the waters of Scoresbysund warrant a vigilant eye for sightings of whales, seals, narwhals, beluga whales and walrus.

Day 13 Ittoqqortoormiit, Greenland

RESIZED Credit Richard Sidey Ittoqqortoormiit

Image Credit: Richard Sidey

On the northern side of the entrance to the Scoresbysund fjord system stands Ittoqqortoormiit, the only permanent settlement in the region. The population here is approximately 430 people, largely dependent on a subsistence lifestyle. The inhabitants make their living hunting seals, narwhals, muskoxen and polar bears. Ittoqqortoormiit is the northernmost settlement on Greenland’s east coast, apart from a few meteorological and military stations. Brightly colored, quaint little houses and dogsled enclosures dot the rocky slopes of the settlement. It must be incredible to live here every day enjoying the magnificent views of Kap Brewster and the Volquart Boon Coast to the south.

Day 14 At Sea

Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is whale watching from the Observatory Lounge, writing home to your loved ones or simply relaxing, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.

Day 15 Reykjavik, Iceland

Reykjavik Iceland

Sprawling Reykjavík, the nation’s nerve center and government seat, is home to half the island’s population. On a bay overlooked by proud Mt. Esja (pronounced eh-shyuh), with its ever-changing hues, Reykjavík presents a colorful sight, its concrete houses painted in light colors and topped by vibrant red, blue, and green roofs. In contrast to the almost treeless countryside, Reykjavík has many tall, native birches, rowans, and willows, as well as imported aspen, pines, and spruces. Reykjavík’s name comes from the Icelandic words for smoke, reykur, and bay, vík. In AD 874, Norseman Ingólfur Arnarson saw Iceland rising out of the misty sea and came ashore at a bay eerily shrouded with plumes of steam from nearby hot springs. Today most of the houses in Reykjavík are heated by near-boiling water from the hot springs. Natural heating avoids air pollution; there’s no smoke around. Disembark here in the morning and explore the centre of Reykavik before re-embarking on the ship and welcoming your new fellow expeditioners for the rest of your journey.

Day 16 At Sea

Arctic bird life

Relax and enjoy the scenery as you sail from Reykjavik to explore more of Greenland. Keep an eye out for birdlife and sea life from the deck.

Day 17 Skjoldungen, Greenland

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Located on Greenland’s rarely visited rugged east coast, Skoldungen Fjord has enchanting scenery with towering mountains tipped with snow, ice-scraped valley sides and sculptured icebergs in shades of white and blue. At the top of the fjord one can easily see the retreating state of the Thrym Glacier. The U-shaped fjord offers spectacular scenery and as an extra perk, it is not uncommon to see whales in the fjord.

Day 18 Prince Christian Sound & Aappilattoq (Kujalleq), Greenland

Silversea RESIZED Credit Denis Elterman Greenland

Image Credit: Credit Denis Elterman

Aapilattoq is a small settlement near the western end of Prins Christian Sund in southwestern Greenland. In the local Greenlandic language the name means, “sea anemone”. This small village of 130 inhabitants, hidden behind a prominent rock, offers a good insight into the life of Greenlandic Inuit. A stroll through the village will reveal a small school and a church, along with the likely possibility of seeing a polar bear skin drying in the wind behind a local dwelling. People have lived off the land in the area around Aapilattoq since the 19th century. The tradition continues today as most people here hunt and fish to make a living.

SILVER SEA Credit Richard Sidey Prince Christian Sound
Image Credit: Richard Sidey

Image Credit: Richard Sidey

Connecting the Denmark Strait with Davis Strait, Prins Christian Sund offers a protected course from southeastern to southwestern Greenland, and is one of South Greenland’s most dramatic natural features. The water is generally placid and the crisp scent of ice fills the air. On either side of the Sund, waterfalls stream down sharp, wrinkled mountainsides. Depending on weather conditions, icebergs that glitter in the sun may be constant companions during the passage. Born of compacted ancient snows that formed glaciers and now calve into the sound at the glacier’s edge, each iceberg is different from the next.

Day 19 Nanortalik (Kujallek) & Uunartoq Island, Greenland

Credit BRUNO CAZARINI uunartoq

Image Credit: Bruno Cazarini

Uunartoq is a small island in South Greenland a short distance east of what once was considered the largest settlement in Greenland. The island has hot springs that were renowned as far back as the days of the Norse for their healing effects. Three naturally heated streams have been channeled to flow into a knee-deep and stone-lined pool. While one unwinds by soaking in the steaming waters, one can watch icebergs that either clog the fjord to the north or come floating by.

Resized Nanortalik Silversea only

Nanortalik lies in a scenic area surrounded by steep mountainsides and is Greenland’s tenth-largest and most southerly town with less than 1500 inhabitants. The town’s name means the “place of polar bears”, which refers to the polar bears that used to be seen floating offshore on summer’s ice floes. Nanortalik has an excellent open-air museum that gives a broad picture of the region from Inuit times to today. Part of the exhibition is a summer hunting camp, where Inuits in traditional clothing describe aspects of their ancestor’s customs and lifestyle.

Day 20 Qaqortoq (Julianehaab) & Hvalsey, Greenland

RESIZED-silversea-arctic-cruise-hvalsey-greenland

Image Credit: Bruno Cazarini

Northeast of Qaqortoq and at the end of a fjord, Hvalsey is one of the best examples of South Greenland’s many scattered ruins from the Norse period. Today the area is used for sheep-grazing, but until the 15th century the settlement at Hvalsey, and specifically Hvalsey’s church, played an important part. Christianity had spread its influence throughout Europe and eventually had reached remote Greenland, where it established itself in the country in 1000 AD. Hvalsey Church was built in the 14th century and is the best preserved of the churches in Greenland from that period. Apart from the church walls, historical ruins from the time of the Norse are just a few meters away.

Resized Richard Sidey Qaqortoq

Image Credit: Richard Sidey

The largest town in southern Greenland, Qaqortoq has been inhabited since prehistoric times. Upon arrival in this charming southern Greenland enclave, it’s easy to see why. Qaqortoq rises quite steeply over the fjord system around the city, offering breath-taking panoramic vistas of the surrounding mountains, deep, blue sea, Lake Tasersuag, icebergs in the bay, and pastoral backcountry. Although the earliest signs of ancient civilization in Qaqortoq date back 4,300 years, Qaqortoq is known to have been inhabited by Norse and Inuit settlers in the 10th and 12th centuries, and the present-day town was founded in 1774. In the years since, Qaqortoq has evolved into a seaport and trading hub for fish and shrimp processing, tanning, fur production, and ship maintenance and repair.

Days 21-22 At Sea

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Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is whale watching from the Observatory Lounge, writing home to your loved ones or simply relaxing. These blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.

Day 23 St Anthony (Newfoundland), Canada

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St. Anthony is a premier location for wildlife and spectacular scenery. The rugged ocean coastline of this town in the Canadian province of Newfoundland is surrounded by whales and icebergs whilst the land is filled with moose, polar bears, birds and unique flora. With a rich history as a successful fishing ground and ports, learn about St. Anthony at the museum or enjoy one of the beautiful hiking trails on offer.

Day 24 Woody Point (Newfoundland), Canada

Silver Sea BRUNO CAZARINI newfoundland woody point

Image Credit: Bruno Cazarini

Acclaimed for its unearthly landscape, Woody Point is probably as close to Mars as you will ever get in this lifetime. Situated on the west coast of the island, the Tablelands behind Woody Point in the Gros Morne National Park are composed of peridotite — like much of the surface of Mars — and NASA, the Canadian Space Agency, plus others are studying this unique land form searching for insights into possible bacterial life on the red planet. The story of the Tablelands earned Gros Morne its World Heritage Site status from UNESCO in 2010, and the area remains a geological wonder, showcasing a time when the continents of Africa and North America collided. When the plates struck 485 million years ago, the peridotite was pushed to the surface, and remained above sea level. The rock lacks the nutrients to sustain plant life, thus giving the Tablelands a barren, isolated appearance.

Day 25 At Sea

Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia

On your final full day at sea relax and take a look back at what an incredible journey you’ve had. Edit and choose your favourite pictures, exchange contact details with you new friends and soak up the incredible landscapes surrounding you.

Day 26 Baddeck, Canada

Silversea BRUNO CAZARINI canada

Image Credit: Bruno Cazarini

Baddeck is the most highly developed tourist center in Cape Breton. Situated at the start of the famous Cabot Trail, the town of 1,064 inhabitants enjoys an international reputation as a fine resort. Baddeck has long been associated with the great inventor Alexander Graham Bell, who built a home here in 1885; it is still owned by his family. While traveling by steamer through the Bras d’Or Lakes, Bell was captivated by the region’s scenic beauty. One of Baddeck’s most notable attractions includes the Alexander Graham Bell National Historic Site, featuring the accomplishments of the famed inventor. The resort is the main town on Bras d’Or Lakes. The area surrounding Baddeck, with steep mountains, rocky inlets and dense forests, is often compared to the Scottish Highlands. The Bras d’Or Lakes, a vast, almost-landlocked inlet of the sea, attracts people from all over the world to cruise the serene, unspoiled coves and islands.

Day 27 Louisbourg (Nova Scotia), Canada

Silversea Louisbourg Bruno Cazarini
Image Credit: Bruno Cazarini

Image Credit: Bruno Cazarini

Baddeck is the most highly developed tourist center in Cape Breton. Situated at the start of the famous Cabot Trail, the town of 1,064 inhabitants enjoys an international reputation as a fine resort. Baddeck has long been associated with the great inventor Alexander Graham Bell, who built a home here in 1885; it is still owned by his family. While traveling by steamer through the Bras d’Or Lakes, Bell was captivated by the region’s scenic beauty. One of Baddeck’s most notable attractions includes the Alexander Graham Bell National Historic Site, featuring the accomplishments of the famed inventor. The resort is the main town on Bras d’Or Lakes. The area surrounding Baddeck, with steep mountains, rocky inlets and dense forests, is often compared to the Scottish Highlands. The Bras d’Or Lakes, a vast, almost-landlocked inlet of the sea, attracts people from all over the world to cruise the serene, unspoiled coves and islands.

Day 28 Halifax (Nova Scotia), Canada

Halifax 2 mikki

Surrounded by natural treasures and glorious seascapes, Halifax is an attractive and vibrant hub with noteworthy historic and modern architecture, great dining and shopping, and a lively nightlife and festival scene. The old city manages to feel both hip and historic. Previous generations had the foresight to preserve the cultural and architectural integrity of the city, yet students from five local universities keep it lively and current. It was Halifax’s natural harbor—the second largest in the world after Sydney —that first drew the British here in 1749, and today most major sites are conveniently located either along it or on the Citadel-crowned hill overlooking it. That’s good news for visitors because this city actually covers quite a bit of ground. There’s easy access to the water, and despite being the focal point of a busy commercial port, Halifax Harbour doubles as a playground, with one of the world’s longest downtown boardwalks.

To book this cruise contact us on 1300 784 794 or email: contact@arctictravelcentre.com.au

We will tailor the perfect holiday to suit your needs.